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When a digression just can't be thrown away

Footnoting

Some non-fiction works use footnotes to digress from the main thesis and explore interesting side-topics. Endnotes are similar to footnotes, except they appear in a group at the end of a chapter or the end of the book.

Blue-phrase has special notemark notation to assist with coalescing and placing footnotes. When an author determines that a sentence or paragraph should be removed from the main composition and placed into a footnote, he can simply delimit the text with asterisk doppelmarks that look like this ** ... **.

Unlike listmarks, citemarks and glossmarks, notemarks do not have interscribed expressions or adjunct expressions, instead the entire text between the doppelmarks is removed from the reading flow and moved to the footnote area.

Here are two examples of notemarks:

This journal ** Gibson presented his journal to the Missouri Historical Society in 1873.** is published here for the first time.

A general order ** Order No. 13, Aug. 17, 1846.** was read at the head of the company.

When this blue-phrase is compiled, the notes are omitted and replaced with footnote symbols. Here's how the example would be emitted:

<p>This journal <a id=nt20 href='#nt24'>*</a> is published here for the first time.</p>

<p>A general order <a id=nt21 href='#nt25'></a> was read at the head of the company.</p>

Building the footnotes/endnotes

The text from all of the notemarks in your manuscript are gathered together and emitted where a build pragma occurs. Notes can be formatted as footnotes (* † ‡ ...) or endnotes (1, 2, 3 ...). Here's what it might look like:

div {
h1 Chapter 1 Endnotes
!build-notes *format=endnotes
}

Then, the relevant portion of the emitted output (ignoring all other notemarks, for brevity) would look like this:

<div>
<h1>Chapter 1 Endnotes</h1>
<ol>
...
<li id=nt24 ><sup><a href='#nt20'>*</a></sup><small>Gibson presented his journal to the Missouri Historical Society in 1873.</small></li>
<li id=nt25 ><sup><a href='#nt21'></a></sup><small>Order No. 13, Aug. 17, 1846.</small></li>
...
</ol>
</div>

Each footnote is hyperlinked back to the place in the body matter where it was written.

When a digression just can't be thrown away